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Archive for the ‘Financial year’ Category

budget 2016
1. HRA benefits to be enhanced from Rs. 24000 per annum to Rs. 60000 per annum under section 80GG.

2. Pensions get boost with NPS benefits tax free upto 40%.Retirement savings boost begins, MF arbitrage continues though. Move to boost retirement savings,

3. Long term capital gains tax on equities seems like it is untouched.Biggest worry for the markets till this morning moves away

4. Tax on dividends in excess of Rs. 10 lakhs introduced at 10%. Double tax again?

5. TDS rationalization introduced. Details awaited.

6. A recent survey shows job application fraud at 5 year high -digital repository of certificates should help.Big benefits for biz

7. New Health Protection scheme upto 1 lakh & additional topup of Rs. 30000 for senior citizens.Good initiative -implementation key

8. Section87A rebate increase from Rs. 2000 to Rs. 5000 practical solution. Cost of compliance possibly higher than tax revs there

9. EPFO & NPS choice gets more complex for employers & employees,with new subsidies on EPS contribution for 3 yrs for new employees

10. First time home buyers – loans upto Rs 35 lkhs – for value of house Rs 50 lkhs – additional tax deductions announced.

11. NRI without pan to get relief. Customs baggage rules for passengers to be simplified.

12. Surcharge for incomes above Rs. 1 cr enhanced to 15%. Very much on expected lines. Clearly not a onetime levy as earlier promised.

13. Voluntary disclosure of domestic undisclosed income with payment of 45%.Hope the fine print does not dissuade disclosures.

14. Central legislation to deal with illicit schemes duping investors

15. Relief for MSMEs with turnover Rs. 2 cr or less – presumptive income

16. Comprehensive code -for resolution mechanism to deal with bankrupty situations. Banks to benefit.

17. Presumptive tax at 50% for professionals earning upto 50 lakhs seems too high. Not sure this works.

18. Deepening of corporate bond market big boost for corporates & Debt mkts. Steps to build retail participation in long term bonds needed

19. NHAI,etc to raise 15000 crore in 2016 to give impetus to infra -more tax free bonds? Good for retirement portfolios if continued.

20. 100% electrification in villages with a target date in 2018 is a big step. Greater confidence on back of past performance.

21. Rs. 55,000 cr for roads n highways – huge investment in road and infra rs 97,000 cr in the coming yearr, togethr with rail @ Rs 218k cr

22. Continued focus on road building is good long term step. Focus on what has a worked well is good mgmt. Build on what has worked.

23. Doubling of farmers income in 5 years will depend on the real income increase i.e. post inflation inc. Hope inflation is controlled.

24. CSR funds & donations for higher education capital fund creation -is Rs 1000 crores good enough for an initiative of this scale?

25. Digital literacy creates equal access, but self help requires intrinsic motivation & job access. Can enough new jobs be created?

26. Fiscal discipline, tax reforms & financial sector reforms as part of 9 pillars of 2016.

27. Fiscal target to be maintained at 3.5% – good news for bond markets & positive for India rating. Fiscal prudence wins for now.

28. Fiscal target range as a strategy to be reviewed through a committee to factor ext. environment changes. Hope range is narrow.

29. Govt gross borrowings and net borrowing numbers seem lower than expectations – positive for bond markets.

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Even if a non-resident Indian (NRI) lives abroad, he may still have income in India. If the income is above a certain exemption limit, he needs to file his income tax return in India just like a resident Indian.

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Who is an NRI for tax purposes?

Before an NRI decides whether or not to file income tax return in India, he needs to first ascertain his residency status for tax purposes (which is different from the definition of residency status under FEMA). An individual is said to be resident in India if he has been in India in that financial year for 182 days or more, or if he has been in India for 60 days or more during the current financial year and for 365 days or more in the preceding four financial years. A person who does not fulfil these conditions would qualify as an NRI.

Next, it has to be determined whether such a person is “ordinarily resident” or “not ordinarily resident” (NOR). A person is not ordinarily resident in the previous year if he has been a non-resident in India in nine out of 10 previous years preceding that year; or has during the seven previous years preceding that year been in India for a period of, or periods amounting to 729 days or less. As an RNOR (resident but not ordinarily resident), a returning NRI needs to pay tax in India only on his Indian income. His income outside India will not be taxed in India. Interest earned on FCNR bank account will not be taxed until maturity, and the same will apply to resident foreign currency (RFC) accounts. After that the person reverts to filing tax as resident and ordinarily resident (ROR) and his global income also gets taxed in India. A person can file tax as RNOR for a maximum of three years.

As an RNOR (resident but not ordinarily resident), a returning NRI needs to pay tax in India only on his Indian income. His income outside India will not be taxed in India.

Which income is taxable?

An NRI should go by the rule that any income that arises or accrues in India, or is deemed to arise or accrue in India, will be taxed in this country. If an NRI receives his salary income in an account in India, he will have to pay tax on it in India. If he renders services in India, even in that case his salary income will be taxed here. Rental income earned from housing property in India and capital gains arising from the sale of an asset situated in India will also be taxed here, as will capital gains on investments and interest earned from bank accounts in India. NRIs can hold three types of accounts–NRO, NRE and FCNR. Of these the interest income from NRO account is taxable.

NRIs can hold three types of accounts–NRO, NRE and FCNR. Of these the interest income from NRO account is taxable.

When does filing return become compulsory?

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NRIs have to file tax return if their gross income in India (before making any deduction) exceeds the basic exemption limit of Rs. 2.5 lakh. They don’t get the benefit of a higher exemption limit based on age, as resident Indians get.

In case TDS has been deducted on an NRI’s income but his gross total income is less than Rs. 2.5 lakh (in which case he is not liable to pay any tax), he must file tax return to claim a refund from the tax department. E-filing is compulsory for claiming refund. Returns must also be filed to carry forward a loss.

NRIs have to file tax return if their gross income in India (before making any deduction) exceeds the basic exemption limit of Rs. 2.5 lakh. They don’t get the benefit of a higher exemption limit based on age, as resident Indians get. In case TDS has been deducted on an NRI’s income but his gross total income is less than Rs. 2.5 lakh (in which case he is not liable to pay any tax), he must file tax return to claim a refund from the tax department.

When is filing of return not required?

If in a given financial year an NRI’s income consists only of investment earnings and/or capital gain from the sale of an asset, he need not file tax return, provided TDS has been deducted on those earnings and gains.

NRIs should, however, remember that an annual information report (AIR) is filed for investments in real estate, mutual funds, bonds, amongst other items, which the IT Department uses to trigger a tax notice. Hence, it is advisable to file a tax return even if your income is below the exemption limit in case you have engaged in high value transactions. Short-term capital gains also do not get the benefit of the exemption limit on income, and hence you should file tax return if you have these gains.

Procedure for tax filing

In case an NRI’s taxable income exceeds Rs. 5 lakh in the previous year, he will have to e-file his income tax return. In case his income is less than the above limit, he also has the option to file the return of income in paper form.

In case an NRI’s taxable income exceeds Rs. 5 lakh in the previous year, he will have to e-file his income tax return. In case his income is less than the above limit, he also has the option to file the return of income in paper form.

The return of income can be filed online through the income tax web sites www.income taxindiaefiling.gov.in or www.incometaxindia.gov.in. He may also take the help of a  professional tax advisor. An NRI may file his return with his digital signature. If he does not have a digital signature, he needs to print ITR-V, which is an acknowledgement that return has been filed online, sign it and send it by ordinary or speed post to the Central Processing Cell, Bangalore. The last date for filing tax returns is usually 31 July.

Avail the benefit of DTAA

Double Taxation Avoidance Agreement (DTAA) is a bilateral agreement entered into between the governments of two countries in order to avoid taxation of the same income twice. Under the Income Tax Act, 1961, NRIs are subject to tax deduction at source (TDS). However, if the NRI is a tax resident of a country with which India has entered into a DTAA, then the provisions of the IT Act or the DTAA, whichever is more beneficial to the NRI, will apply. Even if an income is taxable under the IT Act, if the DTAA provides relief from taxation on that income or provides for a lower rate of taxation, the provisions of the DTAA will prevail. For instance, in case of interest income from bank, TDS as per IT Act is 30.9%, whereas the rate under DTAA with most countries is 15%. By opting for the DTAA rate, an NRI can reduce his tax burden.

To claim the benefit of DTAA, an NRI needs to furnish the TRC (tax residency certificate) of the country where he is a tax resident. The TRC should contain his name and address, status, nationality, tax identification number, residential status for tax purposes and the period for which the certificate is valid. You can’t avail of DTAA unless you provide the TRC and a declaration in Form 10F. To avoid TDS being cut at a higher rate (say, on your bank interest income) and for the DTAA rate to apply, you need to submit a TRC in advance to your bank.

Even if an income is taxable under the IT Act, if the DTAA provides relief from taxation on that income or provides for a lower rate of taxation, the provisions of the DTAA will prevail. For instance, in case of interest income from bank, TDS as per IT Act is 30.9%, whereas the rate under DTAA with most countries is 15%. By opting for the DTAA rate, an NRI can reduce his tax burden. To claim the benefit of DTAA, an NRI needs to furnish the TRC (tax residency certificate) of the country where he is a tax resident.

 

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