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IPO 1

The year so far has not been going well for the equity market yet India has seen a flurry of IPOs getting launched. Between January to June 2018, India has recorded as many as 90 IPO launches, the highest globally so far. The latest to join the band wagon was HDFC AMC and coming up next is Lodha.

Does it make sense to invest in the IPOs? And if yes how do you pick one? Read to find out more.

What is an IPO?

For a company to grow and expand it requires huge amounts of capital; an IPO helps them raise much more money than what they can raise through borrowing or private equity investors. An IPO stands for Initial Public Offering; it is the very first time a company offers its stocks to the public. Prior to an IPO the company is considered private with a relatively small number of shareholders. With the IPO the company becomes public and thereafter, it’s shares can be traded through an Exchange.

Why is there a frenzy around IPOs?

Every investor is looking for a diamond in the rough. Through an IPO the investors tries to purchase the shares at an IPO price which may be significantly lower than it’s future market price when it eventually starts trading on an exchange. This is where huge capital gains can be made.

As per data, the HDFC AMC offer was over subscribed 83 times by the end of the 1st day. What this means is that there was a demand of over 83 times for the shares offered by the company. The investors saw huge growth potential in the company and every one wanted to get a piece of it. Unfortunately, getting an allotment of a hot IPO can be very difficult, if not impossible.

Understanding the IPO process

A company that wishes to launch an IPO has to first register itself with Securities and Exchange Board of INDIA (SEBI) and submit its prospectus for approval. Once the SEBI gives a go ahead, the company fixes the price and the number of shares it plans to issue through the IPO.

 There are two types of IPO issues: fixed price and book building. In the former, the price of the share is decided in advance. In the latter the company offers a prices range and the investor needs to bid for the share within that range. The upper limit is known as the cap price while the lower is called floor price.

While applying for shares the investor needs to bid as per the lot size mentioned in the prospectus. Lot size is the minimum number of shares you have to apply for during an IPO.

For eg: If the you wished to buy 50 shares of XYZ company and the lot size is 10 shares/lot then you would have to bid for 5 lots. As per the SEBI rules, one can’t bid in decimals.

It is important to note that even if you have successfully subscribed to an IPO there is no guarantee that you will receive your lot. If the issue is popular and gets oversubscribed then it becomes difficult to issue even 1 lot to each successful applicant. In such cases the lots are allotted based on a computerized lucky draw.


Things you should consider before applying for an IPO

  • Read the Red Herring prospectus. It can be difficult to analyze the performance of a private company since there is no historical data to draw on. So the red herring becomes an important document to gauge the business prospect and operations of the company.
  • Look closely at the management team; they should be capable of steering the company towards growth after it goes public. Look for how they plan to utilize the funds received from the IPO.
  • Compare it’s bid price to that of the competitors in the market. That will give you a fair idea as to if the IPO is over priced or a value purchase.
  • You will need to have a Demat account since the shares can not be received in the physical mode.
  • Some investors like to subscribe to an IPO because some lucky people had bought shares in the IPOs of companies that went on to pay huge dividends or soar in value. But just because investing in IPOs has worked for some in the past doesn’t mean you’ll get the same returns.
  • The target investor for an IPO are the institutional investors and a big part of the shares are reserved for them. This leaves a small percentage of shares available to the retail investor. Your best chance to get an allotment would be to check the “cut-off price” option in your application form. This way if the IPO is oversubscribed, then you have a better chance of getting a subscription.
  • Since you will need to block the money required while bidding, you can use an ASBA (Application Sorted by Blocked Amount)account while applying for shares. The blocked amount stays in the ASBA account and earns interest till the allotment can happen. And only an amount equivalent to the allotment is deducted.

Going back to the main question, should you invest in an IPO? The answer depends on your investment outlook. IPOs are definitely a good investment option if you are looking for value investing or under the radar deals but then so is everyone else.

If the company has been in the business for long, has good performance history and management team then it definitely is worth the shot but then again there is no guarantee that you would be able to get your hands on a lot or two.

If you’re not sure whether investing in an IPO will be a good move for your portfolio, consider talking to a financial advisor. A financial advisor can evaluate your investment decisions in the context of your overall financial situation and goals.

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